Sometimes not having any idea where we’re going works out better than we could possibly have imagined.

I think that whenever you can add a music element or a film element, or an interactive game, or audience participation, that’s always a lot of fun. I think that it’s nice when there’s a social element, so that people aren’t just there to hear from you, they’re also there to hear from each other, so it’s not just like they can be home watching you on Livestream. They’re in a community with like-minded people, and that’s a really valuable thing that you’re offering as well as your own work.
Rachel Fershleiser on book events, talking to Togather.


Fresh ideas come when your brain is relaxed and engaged in something other than the particular problem you’re embroiled in.
Debra Kaye’s article, “Why Innovation Brainstorming Doesn’t Work” in Fast Company. 

Etsy video profile of Sophie Blackall, whose work I adore and admire.

(Via @brainpickings.)



theimpossibletrees:

The Tallest Man On Earth & Idiot Wind - Working Titles (by ilcorvojo4)

(via magicandchocolate)


kewaskum:

The Bird King: An Artist’s Notebook
Shaun Tan
Shaun Tan has made some very strange books. “The Arrival” was his ode to the immigrant experience; a giant, wordless comic strip that told the story of someone trying to fit in to a new place. “The Bird King” shows Tan’s rough-drafts, sketches, and storyboards for all kinds of new ideas.

kewaskum:

The Bird King: An Artist’s Notebook

Shaun Tan

Shaun Tan has made some very strange books. “The Arrival” was his ode to the immigrant experience; a giant, wordless comic strip that told the story of someone trying to fit in to a new place. “The Bird King” shows Tan’s rough-drafts, sketches, and storyboards for all kinds of new ideas.

(via magicandchocolate)


millionsmillions:

Sometimes, Virginia Woolf took a break from her busy schedule of constant brilliance in order to write children’s stories for her nephews’ newspaper, The Charleston Bulletin. A taste: “When in a good and merry mood Trisy would seize a dozen eggs, and a bucket of flour, coerce a cow to milk itself, and then mixing the ingredients toss them 20 times high up over the skyline, and catch them as they fell in dozens and dozens and dozens of pancakes.”
[Image via The Guardian.]

millionsmillions:

Sometimes, Virginia Woolf took a break from her busy schedule of constant brilliance in order to write children’s stories for her nephews’ newspaper, The Charleston Bulletin. A taste: “When in a good and merry mood Trisy would seize a dozen eggs, and a bucket of flour, coerce a cow to milk itself, and then mixing the ingredients toss them 20 times high up over the skyline, and catch them as they fell in dozens and dozens and dozens of pancakes.”

[Image via The Guardian.]

(via penelopetoole)


To me the process is the interesting part. The finished product is more like when you’ve finished a jigsaw puzzle. It’s become something else. It’s sorting through all the possibilities that’s the fun part. And the painful part!
Shaun Tan, in this Q & A over at Publishers Weekly.